Last Film You've Seen

Dr Strange 2

Had some interesting ideas, but I thought it was largely average. The first movie was way better. 2.8/5 stars.

Would have to say my favourite bit was Dr Strange controlling the dead Dr Strange, and when Wanda got trapped in the mirror dimension (or whatever), and quickly figured her way out of it. The Illuminati and their fight scenes were largely a let down / boring, though I liked the way the whisper dude died. Was a short interaction, but interesting.
 
The Lost City

Birthday present for my Mum. I didn't research much into it. Some stuff I'd seen about it seemed funny. I think we were both expecting it to be more of an action comedy flick, but it's really what I understand to be your average romcom (a genre I avoid like the plague), with some action elements, and the comedy doesn't usually land. Can't take Radcliffe seriously as the villain, etc. 2.4/5 stars.
 
Thor: Love and Thunder

  • The movie seems to take itself even less seriously than Ragnarok (I enjoyed Ragnarok more, despite its faults). The tone of the first two films being even more distant in likeness.
  • Was one of those films where I had to turn off my brain to enjoy it.
  • None of the action sequences really had any weight to them, which was a CGI issue. Tis a shame because they weren't too bad in a structural sense. The first battle scene where he destroys that temple in the end is probably my favourite. All down hill from there. The sound was rather flat in them also, which I'm sure didn't help. Not sure if that was the cinema I was in or the film.
  • The goats got the most laughs from the audience.
  • I think my favourite idea was the jealousy of Thor's axe and the faux drama sub-plot around that.
  • Natalie Portman's choice to sacrifice herself didn't have the oomph I'd have liked it to have. Missed opportunity.
2.8/5 stars.
 
Bullet Train. I enjoyed it, was a fun action film (bunch of top class assassins on a train to Kyoto fighting over a case of money)
with a diverse cast. Then I looked it up, and discovered that it was based on a novel in which most of the original cast were Japanese.

Interesting dilemma, because is that diversity appropriation? A couple of Japanese characters remain, but the others are replaced by( going by the accents) two Brits, two Americans, a Russian (played by an American) and a Puerto Rican actor playing a Mexican. And there's also a character who is Russian disguised as a Brit played by an American.

It's a very uh, Anglosphere-ish kind of diversity. No Asian minorities or Africans or South Americans, and a lot of the non American characters are played by American actors. It's diverse, but it's a specific kind of diversity that people in America care about (except no Native Americans because that weirdly doesn't come up very often for some reason) for a story set in Japan originally involving Japanese characters.

It's probably the best commercial decision to do it like that for an international audience, but is it a good change or appropriating a Japanese story to appeal to US values? I don't know how to feel.
 
AKA
Fancy
Did anyone see Titane? That was a film I really expected to like but instead it made me ????
It’s been on my list of films to check out! :o

Bullet Train. I enjoyed it, was a fun action film (bunch of top class assassins on a train to Kyoto fighting over a case of money)
with a diverse cast. Then I looked it up, and discovered that it was based on a novel in which most of the original cast were Japanese.

Interesting dilemma, because is that diversity appropriation? A couple of Japanese characters remain, but the others are replaced by( going by the accents) two Brits, two Americans, a Russian (played by an American) and a Puerto Rican actor playing a Mexican. And there's also a character who is Russian disguised as a Brit played by an American.

It's a very uh, Anglosphere-ish kind of diversity. No Asian minorities or Africans or South Americans, and a lot of the non American characters are played by American actors. It's diverse, but it's a specific kind of diversity that people in America care about (except no Native Americans because that weirdly doesn't come up very often for some reason) for a story set in Japan originally involving Japanese characters.

It's probably the best commercial decision to do it like that for an international audience, but is it a good change or appropriating a Japanese story to appeal to US values? I don't know how to feel.
I really like what you had to say about a very specific sort of diversity. It comes across as corporate pandering (I suppose is the best word?) for a greater market appeal, in a similar way that companies will rainbowash their logos, social media, shops, etc during Pride. There may be an end goal selling a quality product, but there’s the added incentive of selling as much of that product as possible, even at the cost of authenticity.

Also comes across as a bit uh… whitewashy lol? Though, I’m looking it up now and the author has apparently said his characters are “ethnically malleable” aka he doesn’t give a fook, so I suppose folks oughta can their yap on the matter. 😛
 
Nope

No actual story spoilers here because you should see it, but I guess I'll share some structural spoilers :P. I like how it opens a lot of threads you don't even realise are threads, and then closes 'em all, and you're like "Ah, I remember that thing casually referenced earlier in the movie, which is now pivotal to the storyline". In regards to the story itself, I will just say that I liked that they approached the genre in a different way. It presses all my all-important creativity criteria buttons. Well-balanced in the comedy department also. I found it hard to hear some of the dialogue, but I eventually got all the necessary information through visual story telling, so it's all good.

Good film. Go see it. 4/5 stars.
 

ThatGuyMikey

Wake Up, Dragon Punch
AKA
Limit Breaker
Requiem for a Dream.

First time watching. Masterpiece imo but it’s something that I can totally understand people disliking. It’s just so harrowing.

One of those movies that I wish I saw sooner. In an alternative timeline stuff like this would’ve influenced me to try to become an actor or a director.

454E1731-66D3-4A5F-8F89-B9BFEBE4F761.jpeg
 
Last edited:
Requiem for a Dream.
I've always referred to it as "The best movie I never want to see again."

Seriously, it's incredibly good about taking every good feeling that dares have the audacity to even consider existing, and methodically grinding it into dust. It's gorgeous, well-written, the actors nail their roles, the music is perfect for every scene, and it left me feeling like a hollowed-out person-shaped husk. I love it for that. I will never watch it again if I can help it.
 
Last edited:
Top Bottom