Playstation 5

X-SOLDIER

Harbinger O Great Justice
AKA
X
Is Xbox doing anything NEW with their controllers though? The way I see it is that Microsoft has always viewed it as essentially the equivalent of getting a new computer and using your old mouse & keyboard.

Meanwhile, Nintendo makes new controllers every generation that manage to always be physically designed as if humans didn't possess hands. Like... I don't think anyone complains about Nintendo changing controllers every generation because their form factor is straight up garbage, but Nintendo also tosses around weird new things on their controllers every generation sort of haphazardly.

Sony by comparison, is doing better on both fronts. They have a really well-liked design, but the similar form factor of PlayStation's controllers hides the fact that they're adding in an absolute SHITTON of different technology from the DS4 to the DS5. That's why they're making sure that all the games developed for PS5 are always using the DS5 controller. Given all the work they've put into it – that just seems obvious (and that also means that they don't need to test against the DS4 controllers). The DS4 controllers work for PS4 games still, but I really think that once people actually have a chance to us them (assuming that they can get their first-party devs to really leverage them well), it'll be obvious why the DS5 is the only controller for the PS5 games.



X :neo:
 

Tetsujin

Ready for the mosh pit, shaka brah
AKA
Tets
Meanwhile, PlayStation and multiplatform games coming to PC can use whatever controller you desire :monster:

I guess it would've been nice for people who own multiple controllers for couch co-op and such to reuse their DS4s but Sony wants to sell stuff I guess :monster:
 

X-SOLDIER

Harbinger O Great Justice
AKA
X
Meanwhile, PlayStation and multiplatform games coming to PC can use whatever controller you desire :monster:
Interestingly, this is where I'd argue that PC gaming definitely stagnates the type of development that happens on consoles.

Like, even just vibration feedback is ancient – it's been pretty common in controllers since like... 1997. Because of that, console games have done a lot of interesting & effective things in using it to alert the player of things that are happening – but PC literally hasn't ever developed anything that does that. It just relies on having a compatible controller from a console.

I think it's why things like the touchpad on the DS4 – or probably even more significantly the touchscreen & touchpad combo on the Vita didn't get really heavily utilized as well as they could've – because you need to have multi-platform compatibility. It's this kind of thing where I think that it's oftentimes worth taking a stand and ensuring that your new technology gets used, because we're not going to see that become a commonplace thing otherwise.

I don't want to be stuck with the lowest common denominator in controllers forever – because they SHOULD be getting improved upon.




X :neo:
 

Tetsujin

Ready for the mosh pit, shaka brah
AKA
Tets
I really don't agree with any of that. Especially since the DualSense does not introduce essential features, just more gimmicks that can be easily ignored, probably even turned off in the games themselves like vibration.
 

X-SOLDIER

Harbinger O Great Justice
AKA
X
I really don't agree with any of that. Especially since the DualSense does not introduce essential features, just more gimmicks that can be easily ignored, probably even turned off in the games themselves like vibration.
This is... exactly my point though.

Think about a supernatural game where the controller vibration is used to send a heartbeat pulse through the controller to emulate the character sensing when danger is nearby, and that the pulse picks up as you get closer as a sort of "hot-cold" sensor for things that you can't see or hear. That way, you can have different visual or audio cues for each encounter that aren't competing with the "hot-cold sensor" mechanism.

If you just think of that vibration functionality as being a gimmick that you can disable – the game developers now need to come up with a secondary UI mechanism to communicate that same information via visual or audio information – when the physical vibrating heartbeat is the mechanism that they want to use.

In that context, if you consider the vibration as an "essential feature" of the controller then you can build a game around that type of interaction. If it's just a gimmick, then you'll never be able to leverage that kind of thing reliably if you're releasing on a platform like PC.


So, now when looking at the DS5, they have triggers where they can adjust the tension. This is something where you could link a fatigue system into making it more and more difficult to pull that trigger until you have a chance to recover. Those things are really interesting ways to communicate gameplay that aren't just about putting a stamina bar on screen, but making it easier to have the player's experience match that of the character that they're controlling.

The issue is that new things are thought of as gimmicks because not all controllers have them, so they're things that have to be removed to be available cross-platform... which is the whole issue.



X :neo:
 

Tetsujin

Ready for the mosh pit, shaka brah
AKA
Tets
If you just think of that vibration functionality as being a gimmick that you can disable – the game developers now need to come up with a secondary UI mechanism to communicate that same information via visual or audio information – when the physical vibrating heartbeat is the mechanism that they want to use.
Having multiple options is something I'd kind of consider better game design though.
Cross-platform availability and easy portability for future console generations that may or may not have certain hardware gimmicks (like Dualshock 4 dropping pressure-sensitive buttons) is more important imo.
 

The Twilight Mexican

Ex-SeeD-ingly good
AKA
TresDias

Lulcielid

Media Thinker
AKA
Lucis Caelum
Devs talking about what they can/will do with the dualsense controller.



“The haptic feedback precision allows us to do all sorts of new things. In Marvel’s Spider-Man: Miles Morales, we’ll be hinting to players which direction attacks are coming from by providing haptic feedback from the appropriate direction on the DualSense wireless controller. What does it feel like to use Miles’s stealth ability? How does a Venom Blast feel? Because of the high resolution of DualSense wireless controller’s haptics system, we can really push the dimensionality of the feedback. For instance, as you hold down Square to do a Venom Punch, you feel Spider-Man’s bio-electricity crackle across from the left side of the controller, culminating in the right side on impact.” –Brian Horton // Creative Director, Marvel’s Spider-Man: Miles Morales



I’m really excited by the adaptive triggers and the haptic feedback, both features that will bring some physicality in game experiences, and give important feedback. Deathloop being a first-person shooter, we do a lot of things to make weapons feel differently from one another. One I like is blocking the triggers when your weapon jams, to give to the player an immediate feedback even before the animation plays out, which prompts the player in a physical way that they have to unjam their gun. –Dinga Bakaba // Game Director, Deathloop



Just as the name “trigger” suggests, the main use of the DualSense wireless controller’s adaptive triggers in Ghostwire: Tokyo is for “active” actions—to shoot or trigger something—and we also use them to create the sensation of recoil. We’re also looking at ways to take advantage of the adaptive triggers to express a sense of persistent energy, or a balance of forces if you will, and for perhaps actions such charging, loading, and a sense of accumulation of power or energy for things.The haptic feedback, in comparison to the vibration function of previous generations, allows us to utilize a much wider range, starting from a very strong vibration that is much more powerful than before, down to extremely light vibration. This way we can offer players very detailed, “textured” nuances. Because of this, our approach is different – it isn’t a transient or a constant vibration level anymore, it allows us to meticulously adjust the feedback throughout the game. – Kenji Kimura // Director, Ghostwire: Tokyo



Horizon Forbidden West features new weapons that are designed to feel unique and play a specific role in combat with machines and human opponents. The DualSense wireless controller adaptive triggers will help us to make the weapons feel even more unique and satisfying to use.— Mathijs de Jonge // Game Director, Guerrilla



With the DualSense wireless controller and the power of haptics, we can make the combat [in Demon’s Souls] feel grittier, darker, and deadlier. Now you feel every blow as you strike down your enemies and cast each spell. You’ll experience the force of a titanic boss’ attack as you pull off a well-timed guard. Metal strikes metal when your foes block your attacks or you block theirs. That extra sensory feedback through the controller allows you to know your attack hit home and your perfectly-timed parry was a success, so you can react faster and more decisively.

We can also turn the simple act of pulling a lever to open a gate into a sensory experience. This is something that rumble could never do. It could never replicate the feeling of metal striking metal or fire crackling in your hand as you conjure magic. Haptics [are] integral to the experience, to immersing the player in the world and adding to the gameplay. The visual, aural, and tactile working together takes this new generation of gaming into the future. — Gavin Moore // Creative Director, SIE Japan Studio



As a player, I’m excited to finally FEEL which weapon I’m holding in my hands without looking at any UI. I can also sense where an enemy is spatially, even outside of my field of view. — Keith Lee // CEO, Counterplay Games



The adaptive triggers are something we’re excited to feature [in Ratchet & Clank: Rift Apart]! For instance, the Enforcer is a dual-barreled shotgun type weapon. As you pull the trigger, you’ll fire from one barrel, and you can feel resistance around halfway down the trigger. Need a bigger blast? Pull the trigger through that resistance point and you’ll fire both barrels at the same time. — Marcus Smith // Creative Director, Insomniac Games



As a developer, we want to surprise with unexpected feelings so the haptic feedback has been our central focus [for Astro’s Playroom]. The concept of “feeling the world” is omnipresent, that’s a significant step forward in immersion. I tried turning haptic feedback off once, and could not believe how much I missed it. It is a game changer for sure!

We use haptic feedback throughout the entire game. The most striking are the surfaces because players will notice within the first few seconds. Astro’s steps can be felt running on plastic, metal, sand, and even splashing in water. –– Nicolas Doucet // Studio Director, Japan Studio



Adaptive triggers have enabled us to provide sensations which match what Sackboy would feel in game. For example, when picking objects up, there is a tension to each press which conveys that the little guy is struggling to carry it. Similarly, when equipped with the grappling hook, R2’s ‘Weapon Mode’ makes the player feel like they’re actually firing it themselves.— Ned Waterhouse // Design Director, Sumo Digital



I think the most effective use of the adaptive trigger [in Gran Turismo 7] is for representing the operation of the antilock brake system (ABS) while braking. A typical ABS releases brake pressure intermittently while the driver applies pressure to the pedal. The adaptive trigger is suited for recreating this pedal feel, and it will allow the player to accurately feel and understand the relationship between the braking force they want and the tire’s grip.

Compared to the rumble force feedback we had in the past, the special character of the haptic feedback is that it has a bigger range of frequencies it can produce.

What this means, is that sound design and tactile design can be handled in a continuous, integrated manner. — Kazunori Yamauchi // President, Polyphony Digital
 

Lulcielid

Media Thinker
AKA
Lucis Caelum
Time to pre-order without price!!

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Who will be selected to receive an invitation?

Our selection is based on previous interests and PlayStation activities.

When will I know if I’ve been selected or not?
If you are selected, we will contact you via email before pre-orders start. If you do not receive an email, you were not selected.

If I receive an invitation, am I guaranteed to be able to pre-order a PS5 console?
No. Each invitation is open for a limited time and quantities are limited per PSN ID per transaction:
  • 1 PS5 Console or 1 PS5 Digital Edition
  • 2 DualSense wireless controllers
  • 2 DualSense charging stations
  • 2 Pulse 3D wireless headsets
  • 2 Media remotes
  • 2 HD Cameras
PS5 console pre-order reservations will be first come first serve.

In order to pre-order, do I have to pre-order everything?
No. As long as your product selection falls within unit limits, you may pre-order as many or as few products as you’d like.

How long will I have to make a PS5 console pre-order reservation?
If selected, the expiration date and time will be included in your selection notification email and while supplies last.

Can I reserve more than one PS5 console pre-order?
Due to limited quantities and high demand, we will be limiting PS5 console pre-order reservations to 1 per PSN ID.

Will other PS5 products be available for pre-order?
Yes. Although these will be open to the general public for pre-order, only PS5 console reservations will be limited to those invited to pre-order.

What if I receive a “Sold Out” message?
All available PS5 consoles have been reserved.

I currently reside outside the US. If invited, can I still make a PS5 console pre-order reservation?
If you receive an invite and units are still available, as long as you ship to a US based address, your pre-order reservation will be allowed.
Any orders that contain a non-US based address will be cancelled.
 
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