• Due to datamining of the demo files, substantial leaks are now everywhere. As a reminder, some of these are in-development screenshots and may point to events that aren't going to be in the final game. Some of them are clearly going to be in the game. The TLS stance is this: Any thread which will contain discussion on the leaked images/ details must clearly contain [SPOILERS] within the title. Anything within those threads does not need to be spoiler tagged. Any POST anywhere on the board containing spoilers must be spoiler tagged or it will be removed and warned. Please report this where you see it. Let's try to make sure everyone can still freely post until everyone has a chance to play this game please!

Star Wars: Episode 7, 8... and BEYOND!

X-SOLDIER

Harbinger O Great Justice
AKA
X
:prefacepalm:

Please, do tell me when you actually have something meaningful to contribute to a thread somewhere, Wander. :awesomonster:

But really, most of what you have to say everywhere is essentially just shitposting a two sentence variant of, "This sucks." in as many different places as possible. Next time you find yourself wander-ing around active threads & thinking about posting, take a moment and consider whether or not my response to you from when you first rematerialized from the æther earlier this year in this very thread would apply:
Be careful not to cut yourself on all that edge, Wander. :monster:
If that alone is an appropriate response to what you think about a thread, maybe make sure that any of your personal musings contain a tiny bit more substance in them before clicking, "Post reply" ;)





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wander

‪‫‬‭ ‮
I'll have you know that I've been making meaningful contributions to discussions as of late.

Just not in this particular thread at this particular time.

I'm sorry. I'm sorry for pooping on Star Wars, a sad victim of many abuses. First, a victim of a crazy man, unhinged, at the helm of the prequels; second, a victim of franchise necromancy by an insatiable corporation.

I'm sorry that I took one look at the series of novels written on the prior page about politics and decided that the thread was a car crash.

And I'm sorry for not fleshing out my argument. The bottom line is that Star Wars and The Empire Strikes Back were practically flukes, and Return of the Jedi a tolerable but worrisome harbinger of things to come. The prequels weren't even that bad, they were let down by laughable dialogue, CGI abuse, atrocious casting – but they were at least their own thing.

Then we come to the new sequels. Disney fronts the bill for some decent CGI and the dialogue/acting has more polish, but the writing is dire. Force Awakens was just A New Hope copypasted, The Last Jedi managed to just throwback to prequel cancer with its weird sense of humour, bizarre subplots, underdeveloped villain getting iced and yeah, just awful.

Not to mention Luke just managed to become a completely different person for the sake of... giving the writer the room to
avoid any accusation of rehashing old material. I guess anyone can go write for Disney if they don't need to know the difference between continuity and rehashing old ground.

It's like they're just incapable of telling a story without trying to appease people, which is always a mistake.

I won't list all the fallacies and bullshit of TLJ, because I have stuff to do and it has all been talked to death elsewhere and probably here too. Episode IX is doomed to suck thanks to where VIII has left it.

Rogue One was shit too. I give it points for not trying to be anything that it isn't, it just told a story without any problems. The characters were just weak as fuck. That monk guy was a total cliché, and an annoying one at that... and the main character was extremely dull.

Haven't watched Solo. I'm done with Star Wars. It exists to print money for Disney now.
 

wander

‪‫‬‭ ‮
and what the fuck story did they pick for VII/VIII/IX anyway? Where's Mara Jade and the cloned/resurrected Emperor?

The Emperor spent his life trying to learn the secret to cheating death, and if Leia can survive in space I think Palpatine can survive a bit of a tumble.

And what about the aliens from another galaxy who are immune to the force or whatever? Yuuzhan-Vong or something like that? That would make a great movie trilogy.

They want to fuck with Luke's character? Have him join the dark side for a bit.

All of this shit existed in the Expanded Universe material.

but noooo
 

X-SOLDIER

Harbinger O Great Justice
AKA
X
I think that it should be pretty clear that if you currently are, and in fact have been, “done with Star Wars” films since being disappointed by the fuzzy-Vietnam allegorical end of the original trilogy in 1983 – there should be no need to rant about that in a thread discussing the new films, when you have nothing to add insofar as the current conversation on that topic is concerned.

I'll have you know that I've been making meaningful contributions to discussions as of late.

Just not in this particular thread at this particular time.
Well, in the last 10 days, I have seen the same sort of negative-stream-of-consciousness comments from you in threads on other Star Wars series, current events in UK politics, a year-and-a-half-long-dead-thread on grunge music, Netflix series, Pokémon GO, NANoWriMo, new member threads, & general conversation, so do forgive me if I’ve managed to miss the meaningful contributions to discussions that you’ve been adding amongst the perpetuation of that less-than-helpful trend that my post referred to. Suffice to say, the warning was well-warranted, especially given that last time you showed up for a day at the start of this year, you made 5 posts: one of which was helpful, and the other four posts followed the same overall trend of essentially being drive-by-shitposting.

Also, even in your most recent double-post (there have always been edit buttons here, please make use of them) it’s just a longer list of broadly general things that you dislike about the direction of Star Wars in general, end-capped by sarcasm about not using old non-canon Legends content. It’s not actually informative or dialogue of any kind either, nor is it really on the topic that was previously being discussed.


That all being said, if you’re actually curious about the storyline that VI, VIII, & IX have been presenting (given that only 2/3rds of the story’s been revealed at this point), I’ll indulge you.

It’s addressing what Anakin’s legacy on the Force was, since as the Chosen One that was introduced in Episode I, he brought balance to the Force at the end of Return of the Jedi with the defeat of the Sith – but exactly what that is and what it means has never been directly addressed outside of Lucas’ highly mythological look at the prophesy taking place across the Prequel and Original film trilogies during the Mortis Arc in Clone Wars.

That’s why in The Force Awakens, Anakin’s lightsaber and genetic legacy are explored with Rey & Ben as the focal points of each others’ balance in the Force as light and dark, while loosely re-treading the cycle of events of A New Hope over again. It’s why The Last Jedi re-addresses the lingering injustices in the galaxy that went unaddressed from Anakin’s past. It’s why it’s actively subverting the things that the Jedi & Sith embraced as definitively good or evil, while also addressing breaking the cyclical nature of the conflict against light and dark by both following, but also breaking free of the story beats of the original trilogy Star Wars films. It's showing that the historical legacy of a thing of a thing can be greater than the individual things that made it up when deeply scrutinized, while also pointing to how to continue to make a thing in the image of what made it great without being strictly held down by its shortcomings.

Lastly, it’s also a broad commentary on the late stages of a pre-fascist phase of a sociopolitical environment that matches the one we seem to be broadly experiencing, since Star Wars also often has a connection to current political events, even outside just the WWII space fantasy setting that it adopts.






X :neo:
 

X-SOLDIER

Harbinger O Great Justice
AKA
X
http://instagr.am/p/Bqcj_AVFnTQ/
Interesting that the old Luke Skywalker hiding away in a cave, who was supposed to be reminiscent of Col. Kurtz was something planned as far back as Jan 2013. This has recently been making rounds on the internet showing that Luke's portrayal wasn't all just Rian Johnson's idea, but was in place from the get-go, and something he adapted into how he wrote Luke.




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Charles Xavier

Pro Adventurer
AKA
I wish I had a more original name, but 'Charles Xavier' has always stuck to me for some reason.
Wow, I've been away from these forums for far too long. What the hell did I miss? What's on my mind right now: J.J. Abrams is back directing IX and are they seriously going full-out digital with Leia or are they just using unreleased footage?
 

X-SOLDIER

Harbinger O Great Justice
AKA
X

Looks like we're getting a relatively small, but still decent jump forward. It'll be interesting ta see how this feels, especially since the real time gap will be almost twice as long. Weird to think that more time will have passed in real life than in the time during the actual sequel trilogy.




X :neo:
 

X-SOLDIER

Harbinger O Great Justice
AKA
X
I'm up on my tl;dr TLJ shit again!



I really dig this look on the film, and he hits a lot of interesting points about how it's portrayed, and about 20 mins in, he hits on the point of Rey's parentage and disappointment. I think that it's interesting in how I hadn't thought that there's a conflation in the feelings between the answer and the fan perception:

"It's not a disappointing story answer, it's a disappointing character answer. It is intentionally unfulfilling, and that's the point of it. The point of it is that it's not a happy, fulfilling, complicated, rich answer. It's just a little empty, and it's a little sad, but that's the emotion that it's meant to evoke. You go into it and, well, not everything is fulfilling, Some things just are disappointing.

And disappointment is a tricky emotion for movies and video games and television. It's a tricky emotion to play with, because it is a very, very fine line to walk between something that evokes disappointment as a conscious emotion, and something that's just unfulfilling as a story beat. So I think they managed to thread that needle really well."

Post-TFA there was a massive amount of hype and speculation all centered on Rey's parentage. What she learns is ultimately disappointing to her, because it's meant to be the hardest answer that she could have received, since the middle chapter of a trilogy is all about pushing through a gauntlet of trials just past what the characters believe that they're capable of. For Rey, this is becoming a part of something bigger, trying to find her destiny and where she belongs, only to discover that she doesn't belong already and only belongs because she is actually there as a result of being drawn in to the events (by the Force awakening within her and guiding those actions).

The film is incredibly centered on that emotion and it delivers that as a DEEPLY crushing blow, but what's interesting is that for a lot of people, they felt that same sense of crushing defeat and pointlessness from that answer, but they took it personally. They looked at Star Wars as needing to be telling stories for them specifically and to do the things that they want, because they have a vested sense of agency with Star Wars itself. Suddenly, the fact that that didn't happen meant that clearly Disney, Kathleen Kennedy, and Rian Johnson had all created a story that was meant to personally disconnect THEM, and that every beat and metaphor in the film was supposed to be a message to the fandom itself. Kylo Ren's line of, "Let the past die, kill it if you have to" was all about moving on from the Expanded Universe and that detaching themselves from the false fandom was the path that should be taken, because THEY knew what true Star Wars should be. But at its core, it's because there's a sense of ownership over Star Wars, and since this emotion is used so rarely, most fans don't really process the difference between being disappointed by something and feeling disappointed because of something.


After seeing TLJ, you almost certainly left the theater with a sense of confusion, if not pain and/or disappointment. That was most heavily lensed by how closely you connect to the series, and you consumed that sense of pain and disappointment that the film delivered personally. Rotten Tomatoes' Critic Vs. Audience score is a good indication, but we felt them in this thread as well.

I feel deflated and with so many mixed feelings. I'm fully in favor of breaking away from the Star Wars recipe but it has to work and there were a lot of parts in this movie where it didn't. Maybe I need to watch it again or let sink in for a few more ours to appreciate it more, I don't know.
@X It also remains that I can't bring myself to write a lengthy opinion piece unfolding WHY I feel sad when thinking back to the experience. I am sad that I am no longer invested in the new trilogy, to the point where I can't feel bothered to present a deeper analysis. I'm just so...sad.
Why? – Because it told its story so well that those emotions left the theater with us.

That's why I really pushed at watching the film a second time, with the mindset of attempting to understand the story rather than experiencing it. This is one of those things where how we react to spoilers helps to show why. First viewings are us experiencing the story from the same perspective as the characters themselves, because we don't come equipped with extra knowledge. Spoilers will irreversibly alter that type of viewing. Repeated or spoiled viewings are us experiencing the story as an audience member. You know the parts, but understanding them in context is what makes that difference. That dynamic is what makes a twist ending give you the urge to rewatch a film, and hunt for clues you didn't know you should be looking for.

If it'd missed the mark of cutting those hopes down, it wouldn't've so brutally stabbed right into the heart of people who code a massive part of their identity AS Star Wars. The feeling of endless potential crumbing to dust in your hands and trying to figure out what the hell is left and why there's any point IS the point. You don't WANT to accept that, because it hurts. The reactions of, "There're any other million ways to've gotten something that we wanted more, and there are CLEAR paths the filmmakers could've taken, and as a storyteller they should've been obligated to take to provide us with satisfaction and not disappointment." are that feeling, too. That knee-jerk reaction at the story direction itself is misdirected, because it's from the attachment of approaching the film's first viewing with a set of audience expectations of the story like you would have when re-watching a film, but then experiencing the disappointment from the point of view of the characters and jumping into critical dissection of the film from that feeling, without actually having ever experienced it clearly just as an audience member – only feeling like you had because of what you expected to occur when watching it the first time.


That's also why doing what they did was important, and even more challenging.

Episode IX is the journey back from the brink of hopelessness. With VII & VIII taking place within about a week of one another, it doesn't have the time scale to set up stakes with the gravity of the Prequel or Original trilogies, so it has to play with stakes differently and really double down on the characters' journeys and their personal stakes. As our touch point into the Star Wars universe, those stakes also hurt us a lot, but holding on to that is what gives Episode IX the potential to deliver on what VIII committed to.


Imagine if in RotJ, you learned that Obi-Wan was always telling the truth, and the "I am your father" line was literally just a bluff by Vader.

That one line robbed Luke of all his righteous journey coming after the Empire for having killed his whole family, and took his role away from being an ace pilot of grew up on a farm, and transformed his path into one of a legacy-driven sword-fighting hero – the film even has Wedge take out the AT-AT as he crashes his Speeder and then has him crash his X-Wing and maroon himself on a swamp world to pull that earlier characterization away from him. Luke's trust in Obi-Wan who set him on that path is shaken, he fails at everything he attempts in trying to be this other person, endangers or loses his friends, and ultimately has everything that defined his character in A New Hope stripped away from him in order to confront the path of the new identity and motivations that're placed before him. It seemed like he was going to eventually have to dogfight against Vader and test out their piloting skills against one another to focus on the biggest central theme to Luke's entire character, but with that line, the film threw it all away and re-wrote over all the established motivational precedent for Luke's character.


Now think about how deeply that line just being a bluff would've destroyed everything about the resolution of Luke's journey.

There's no casting down his lightsaber and turning his father by seeing the good in him. There's no struggle and conflict to find the balance between the choices of right and wrong. There's no easy path to just blow up the Death Star, kill the bad guys and save the day. There's no change that Luke experiences that makes him someone who could do what he wasn't capable of before. It's giving up the bigger story to satisfy the immediate wants, based on the initial presentation of what matters to the characters, and what they're capable of. But you can only know that, because you can see the end and look at the story as an audience member. Most people don't even have the opportunity to consume Star Wars without knowing that that reveal is a baked-in part of the journey, so there's almost no context for looking at it that way. The Prequels even get to make Episode III their crushing second act and use the whole original trilogy as a resolution because of that.


The Star Wars thematic arcs are all about accepting that there is pain and weakness in one's self, and embracing your love over the feelings of hatred that causes, in order to achieve a larger victory: Luke accepting that he can't kill his own father and saving him instead. Anakin embracing that neither the paths of the Jedi nor the Sith ever gave him the power to save the ones he cared about, but that he always had that power within him if he'd followed the path to love, rather than the path to finding that power.


So, let's look at Rey's reveal within the stages of grief with Rey's parentage in the film, and the points that it informs, and map that along with the perspective of a first-time audience member:


Denial

• Film: That's the initial shock that Rey experiences in the cave.

• Fans: Just outright disbelief, with the same emotions you'd feel that Vader was lying to Luke, and they're definitely going to reveal that it was all just a ruse in Episode IX. This is the "playing it safe" bet because every other option feels like overcommitting to a path, when knowing that the paths are uncertain.

Anger & Bargaining

Film: Rey confronting Luke in the rain and trying one last time to force him into going to confront Kylo Ren like he should've been doing since she first arrived on the island – otherwise she's going to leave and go do it herself.

Fans: Rey's destiny was how fans engaged with the gap between Episode VII & VIII, and with that being the point of disappointment for her journey, engaging in that kind of discourse carried that sense of hopelessness about how they'd previously engaged with the story in dissecting and speculating. With that avenue not panning out the way they felt that they were owed, there was a retreat back to a "pure" George-Lucas-stuff-only playground where it felt like that empowerment still existed coupled with a rejection of the other environment as disingenuous. That's also followed by constant threats about being able to control the series themselves and using that power to enact the what they feel that they were denied.

Depression

Film: Rey trying to save Ben and that not working out either, and resulting only in even more pain and failure for them both.

Fans: There's no point in the Star Wars saga at all anymore, because everything that started out giving the emotional sense of Star Wars from TFA built up to only give a sense of hopelessness from a series that always made me feel the opposite. All of the fun and optimism has been stripped away from where I was at post-TFA in a way such that there's no way to restore the attachment that I thought I had to it. Everything is inextricably interlinked to this, and the only catharsis possible is looking at what could have been (98% of HISHE videos are pandering to these and the above groups).

Acceptance

Film: Boarding the Falcon without a damn clue on how to proceed, but being confident knowing that they have everything that they need.

Fans: Only knowing that everything that's thematically needed to set up the final chapter of a successful trilogy saga is in place. Looking forward to what's coming next, but being ok about not having a damn clue how that's going to happen. This is resetting expectations as an audience member, so that you can have a first viewing of Episode IX from the point of view of the characters again, and free from the expectations over-attachment to speculation assigns to your viewing experience. Speculation is still enjoyable, but it's also detached from a sense of ownership over the story path that you're speculating about. Loving something and taking power over controlling it so that it never hurts you aren't the same thing (Anakin). Thinking you know it all, coming up with ideas of how things have to be, only to be completely wrong about them and being hurt as a result is ok so long as you learn something from those failures and share that knowledge as well (Luke).


Anyhow, more than a year later this film is still giving me more thoughts about the Star Wars series itself, and also about the social reactions to, and political situations around us, that both help to inform the trajectory of the storytelling of the series. Could still literally talk about this film and the series in general for days on end.






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Carlie

CltrAltDelicious
AKA
Chloe Frazer
I was wondering why one of my posts was quoted since I haven't posted in here in a while. Here's the thing though I waited a couple of months to watch the movie again and not only did it not improve my experience, I have now come to greatly dislike the The Last Jedi. It also gave me a lot of fatigue with this era of Star Wars and I just want this saga to be over and done with. No more Skywalkers and no more of this one or two Jedi and Sith around at one time. I'm over it, is stifling the creativity for Star Wars material. The Old Republic under Star Wars destroyer EA has been able to come up with way more interesting stories than either of the new trilogy movies.
 

X-SOLDIER

Harbinger O Great Justice
AKA
X
Pretty much all of those things with the story being all about the Skywalkers and only a couple of Jedi are a result of what's established in TFA and less specifically about anything that TLJ did, though. Isn't that more just fatigue around the singular narrative of the Episodic Saga itself and just wanting to move into different "playgrounds" for storytelling within the universe, rather than anything specific to that film itself?

Hell, what you're talking about is exactly the reason that Rian Johnson was given a trilogy in a never-before-used part of the Star Wars universe, and why subversion of the preexisting Star Wars tropes was one of the main things TLJ did. I'm curious why it's with TLJ specifically that you have that particular criticism.




X :neo:
 

Carlie

CltrAltDelicious
AKA
Chloe Frazer
Pretty much all of those things with the story being all about the Skywalkers and only a couple of Jedi are a result of what's established in TFA and less specifically about anything that TLJ did, though. Isn't that more just fatigue around the singular narrative of the Episodic Saga itself and just wanting to move into different "playgrounds" for storytelling within the universe, rather than anything specific to that film itself?
Did I say all about the Skywalkers? Cause I'm pretty sure I didn't. Yes I am extremely tired of the saga in general, I am tired of that family and that isn't primarily TLJ fault. But those aren't the main reasons why I hate the movie, I dislike a lot of the creative decisions Johnson made and I don't find it to be the subversive work you do. On second viewing I just found the movie to be a tiring shore to get through.

Hell, what you're talking about is exactly the reason that Rian Johnson was given a trilogy in a never-before-used part of the Star Wars universe, and why subversion of the preexisting Star Wars tropes was one of the main things TLJ did. I'm curious why it's with TLJ specifically that you have that particular criticism.




X:neo:
Look X is difficult to have a discussion with you about The Last Jedi because you don't seem to want to accept that there are people that have legitimate criticisms for the movie and you quoted an old post of mine to explain why I feel a certain way about it, c'mon dude don't do that.
 

X-SOLDIER

Harbinger O Great Justice
AKA
X
Did I say all about the Skywalkers? Cause I'm pretty sure I didn't. Yes I am extremely tired of the saga in general, I am tired of that family and that isn't primarily TLJ fault.
You said, "no more Skywalkers" and given that Episodes 1-9 are the "Skywalker Saga" I was just mentioning that that as well as the Jedi/Sith things weren't TLJ-specific, so I was wondering why you listed those things when mentioning that TLJ gave you Star Wars fatigue, but seemingly weren't really something about that film itself. It's also why I mentioned that moving on to other places specifically for that reason seems to be an active goal everyone has once IX endcaps that saga.

But those aren't the main reasons why I hate the movie, I dislike a lot of the creative decisions Johnson made and I don't find it to be the subversive work you do. On second viewing I just found the movie to be a tiring shore to get through. Look X is difficult to have a discussion with you about The Last Jedi because you don't seem to want to accept that there are people that have legitimate criticisms for the movie and you quoted an old post of mine to explain why I feel a certain way about it, c'mon dude don't do that.
I jumped back in the thread to find peoples' initial reactions when the film came out that centered around the mix of confusing emotions from a first viewing that I also experienced. Your quote was the most succinct expression of that feeling that quoting would link back to that timestamp in the thread of everyone's initial reactions. By the same token, Shademp's post had expressed the lingering sense of sadness and apathy about disconnecting from the series overall post-TLJ. Those were both things that were/are common sentiments at particular times that I wanted a quick example of, and I remembered had been mentioned in this thread.

I very much get that there are people who dislike the film, because things don't work for them. The film critically acclaimed, but is blatantly a divisive one for fans (hence the Rotten Tomatoes link). That's why I wanted to make a post about how the message of disappointment Rey experiences in her journey also attached to the feelings about how the fandom had embraced Star Wars in a way that translated into the sort of confusion, disconnection, and even hostility that was most specifically polarized within the fanbase, and why it was likely less extreme outside of that environment.

Going in, I really wanted to like the film and even I had to check my biases when I first saw it, because I didn't know how to feel about completely. All I knew from his other films is that I had to let myself chew on it, because his other films always feel different the second time around. I got hit just a massive rush of thoughts and confusion around my feelings, and that's why I brought up the different ways that people experience a film on first vs. other viewings. It's specifically that I remembered those things changing as I watched it different times, that this video made me look back on what emotional things hit why and how that you can see in a number of groups of people post-TLJ.




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Gary Caelum

Pro Adventurer
AKA
Gary Caelum

Very, very important stuff. Not necessarily Star Wars-specific, but it also kind is.
It's kinda hard to feel sorry for the guy when he had such a silly attitude toward criticism. He openly admits that he took criticisms of Jar Jar's character as personal attacks on himself. Why? That's not something you're supposed to do as an actor. If you're gonna be that thin-skinned, you really can't be playing such insanely stupid characters like Jar Jar. The only suitable attitude if you're gonna play that character is "Who cares, it's just a job".
 

X-SOLDIER

Harbinger O Great Justice
AKA
X
It's kinda hard to feel sorry for the guy when he had such a silly attitude toward criticism. He openly admits that he took criticisms of Jar Jar's character as personal attacks on himself. Why? That's not something you're supposed to do as an actor. If you're gonna be that thin-skinned, you really can't be playing such insanely stupid characters like Jar Jar. The only suitable attitude if you're gonna play that character is "Who cares, it's just a job".

...Really?

Look at the "criticisms" of Rose & Kelly Marie Tran in The Last Jedi. Just like with Jar Jar & Ahmed Best, it involves an absolutely massive amount of vitriol & racism being directed at the actors themselves.

His interview even openly states that what he experienced wasn't JUST stuff related to what people thought of the character, "There was just so much hate and anger and venom directed at me, and I took it personally… I put a lot of me into that work, and if you talk to any artist who really cares about their work, you’re talking about them… I was called every racial stereotype you can imagine."

These are circumstances where you're looking at what's very likely the biggest role that someone gets in a film in their entire lives, and the amount of attention that that means that it receives is bigger than anything else that you could do, and it's gonna follow you EVERYWHERE if this is your chosen profession, which typically means that it's also destroying your career, as well as your sense of self confidence since that criticism isn't just hitting a character, but it's also hitting the actor as well.




X :neo:
 

Gary Caelum

Pro Adventurer
AKA
Gary Caelum
The social media era is a completely different kettle of fish. People get mobs of psychos abusing them on social media for pretty much any reason. It's far more believable in 2019.

That was a lot harder to do in the early 2000s though. It's especially different when you don't know what the actor looks like (or sounds like). Most people wouldn't have even known the name of the actor. Kelly Marie Tran is easy for weirdos to target because she actually looks like her character. Whereas you wouldn't necessarily know this was the guy who played Jar Jar Binks unless he pointed it out.
So when he says it was "directed at me", what exactly does he mean? Were people writing him letters just to tell him how bad the character was? Or finding his phone number to ring him up and explain? That doesn't sound like something many people would bother to do. It really sounds like he was just poorly prepared for mass public criticism of his character and so he interpreted it as being a direct attack on him.

If he was ever literally followed or personally contacted by people who just wanted to insult him personally, I'd retract my comment. But I really didn't get that sense from listening to him. The fact that he spoke of Jar Jar as if he was really proud of it, just makes it sound like he was really badly prepared for mass public criticism (which mostly wasn't directed at him, it was mostly directed at Lucas for inventing the character in the first place)
 

X-SOLDIER

Harbinger O Great Justice
AKA
X
If he was ever literally followed or personally contacted by people who just wanted to insult him personally, I'd retract my comment. But I really didn't get that sense from listening to him. The fact that he spoke of Jar Jar as if he was really proud of it, just makes it sound like he was really badly prepared for mass public criticism (which mostly wasn't directed at him, it was mostly directed at Lucas for inventing the character in the first place)
Just because mobs of "fans" endlessly harassing people online is easier now doesn't mean that it didn't happen back then, too. And it absolutely wasn't just Jake Lloyd & Hayden Christensen who were personally harassed until they completely or significantly removed themselves from the acting world.

Via: https://www.wired.com/2017/07/ahmed-best-jar-jar-binks-new-podcast/

There were accusations that the character was a throwback to racially charged stereotypes from the early 20th century (the Wall Street Journal review called Jar Jar “a Rastafarian Stepin Fetchit on platform hoofs, crossed annoyingly with Butterfly McQueen”). “I was shocked with the racial implications,” Best says now, “but always knew they had little to no merit.”

Older Star Wars fans were the harshest, offended by the presence of a high-pitched, high-energy, floppy-eared amphibian in what they considered a grownup galaxy. “I had death threats through the internet,” Best says. “I had people come to me and say, ‘You destroyed my childhood.’ That’s difficult for a 25-year-old to hear.”

Because Best was online and connected to the greater Star Wars fan community, he couldn’t avoid the blowback. Two of the forces that had shaped his creative life—the fandom of Star Wars and the freedom of the web—had been turned against him, and the abuse he endured was a sign of how the internet, even in the pre-Twitter era, could both personalize and dehumanize a pop-culture figure all at once.

Really though: If you're ever compelled to make a, "they should just get thicker skin" argument – maybe just don't. It's almost always a bad idea.




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